1) High cholesterol is a key risk factor for heart disease, which remains the No. 1 killer in the United States.

About 630,000 Americans die from heart disease each year. That’s 1 in every 4 deaths.

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2) America ranks as the country with the highest BMI. (Body mass index)

hamburger-2683042_640 (1)Among high-income countries, USA has the single highest BMI (over 28 kg/m2 for men and women), followed by New Zealand. Japan has the lowest BMI (about 22 kg/m2 for women and 24 kg/m2 for men), followed by Singapore.

3) You should be getting your cholesterol checked every 4 to 6 years, at the least.

woman-3187087_640Some health organizations recommend that everyone ages 20 to 79 be checked for the risk of heart attack and stroke every 4 to 6 years. This includes a cholesterol test.

4) 49% of Americans have at least 1 of the 3 main risk factors for heart disease.

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High blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking are three of the main risk factors for heart disease, and according to the CDC, about half of the American population (49%) have at least one of them.

5) Exercising Lowers Blood Cholesterol Levels.

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Research shows aerobic exercises appear to benefit cholesterol the most, by lowering LDL by 5 to 10% and raising HDL cholesterol by 3 to 6%. Water exercises, such as swimming, water walking, and participating in water games, can also produce similar results in your cholesterol profile as aerobic exercise.

6) Most healthy people can eat up to seven eggs a week with no increase in their risk of heart disease.

bacon-1238243_640Chicken eggs are high in cholesterol, but the effect of egg consumption on blood cholesterol is minimal when compared with the effect of trans fats and saturated fats.


Sources
Fact 1: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Multiple Cause of Death 1999-2015 on CDC WONDER Online Database, released December 2016. Data are from the Multiple Cause of Death Files, 1999-2015, as compiled from data provided by the 57 vital statistics jurisdictions through the Vital Statistics Cooperative Program. Accessed at http://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd-icd10.html.
Fact 2:  https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-02/l-cbc020111.php
Fact 3: Goff DC Jr, et al. (2013). 2013 ACC/AHA guideline on the assessment of cardiovascular risk: A report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Circulation, published online November 12, 2013. DOI: 10.1161/01.cir.0000437741.48606.98. Accessed November 22, 2013.
Fact 4: Source: CDC. Million Hearts™: strategies to reduce the prevalence of leading cardiovascular disease risk factors. United States, 2011. MMWR 2011;60(36):1248–51.
Fact 5: CDC. Million Hearts™: strategies to reduce the prevalence of leading cardiovascular disease risk factors. United States, 2011. MMWR 2011;60(36):1248–51.
Fact 6: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/expert-answers/cholesterol/faq-20058468

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